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HARBOUR COLLECTION

A CLASSIC COLLECTION FOR ALL THE SAILERS OUT THERE

HARBOUR COLLECTION

The harbours have been the starting place of so many journeys. From the vikings from the north sailing off to the next battle or why not Christoffer Columbus leaving the english harbours and in the 1500s for the first time exploring what we today know as the United States. Journeys have through time letting us explore new sights of the oceans, arriving at new destinations and giving us a different perspective of the world we live on.

AMBARLI

41°00′49″N 28°57′18″E

The Ambarli harbour is located nearby Istanbul, Turkey and opened in 1989 as a result of a growing nationwide economy that needed better infrastructure with its export section. With it’s very unique location the travel to three different continents ain’t far.Europe, Asia and Africa are all within a close distance and the journey can either go up through the Black Sea or by the Mediterranean Sea.

The Ambarli port is the biggest container port in Turkey and among the 50th largest in the world. Over 4200 container ships with goods yearly dock and depart from Ambarli. In 2015 over 42% of all Turkey’s total container movement is realized at the port.

Ambarli Harbour is is divided into four different sections that in total cover over 1.000.000 square meters. Komport with a dock length of over 2000 meters is the biggest followed by Marport, Mardas and Akcanas.

HANSHIN

34°40’23.39″ N 135°13’22.20″ E

Hanshin Harbour, more known as the Port of Kobe is located in Osaka arena in Japan. Located at a foothill of the range of Mount Rokkō, flat lands are limited and the harbour is mainly build of artificial island. 34 container berths can be found at the area.

In 1858 the Treaty of Amity and Commerce opened the Hyōgo Port to foreigners. In the 1970s the port boasted it handled the most containers in the world. It was the world’s busiest container port from 1973 to 1978.

The 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake diminished much of the port city’s prominence when it destroyed and halted much of the facilities and services there, causing approximately ten trillion yen or $102.5 billion in damage, 2.5% of Japan’s GDP at the time. Kobe was one of the world’s busiest ports prior to the earthquake, but despite the repair and rebuilding, it has never regained its former status as Japan’s principal shipping port.

TANGER

5°46′14.39″N 5°48′10.94″W

Tanger is a cargo port located 40 kilometers east of the city Tangier in Morocco, Africa. Being one of the last ports before ships heading from the Mediterranean out to the Atlantic Ocean it’s a natural last stop to make. The port is aswell one of the biggest in Mediterranean and in Africa. In 2007 it went into service and didn’t reopened fully until 2015. Since then the port has reached full capacity by and can now operate 8 million containers, 7 million passengers, 700,000 trucks, 2 million vehicles, and 10 million MT of oil products. When the last features are added by in 2018, it is expected to be the busiest port on the Mediterranean.

Tours runs a lot connecting Tarifa to Tangier, with passenger traffic greater than 1.2 million per year. The port has three stations for docking fast vessels that serve this route and a ferry terminal scheduled to be modernised and renovated.

Tanger Harbour has over the years been an important way for African companies, especially in Morocco to in an easier way connect with the European market. The close location to Spain and Portugal has especially connected the two continents together.

THE CASES IN HARBOUR COLLECTION

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